fill
fill
fill
Rebecca Thompkins
Mobile Phone:
770-318-5437
rebecca.agent01@gmail.com
fill
fill
fill
fill
Rebecca Thompkins
fill
Mobile Phone:
770-318-5437
rebecca.agent01@
gmail.com
fill
fill
fill
fill
fill
Work With Me
fill
Buyer Info
fill
Seller Info
fill
Your Home's Value
fill
Neighborhood Information
fill
Real Estate Glossary
fill
fill
fill

Great DIY Websites


From decorative crafts to furniture and gardening, nothing is out of reach for the committed Do-It-Yourselfer. If you're looking to save or earn a little extra money, this collection of DIY resources will show you how to start.

1. Instructables

Like many of the resources on this lister, Instructables is made by DIYers, for DIYers. That means nearly all the project plans and instructions are contributed by members of the community. Most Instructables feature clear instructions with plenty of pictures, along with detailed parts and materials lists. The active community offers suggestions and variations via lively comments beneath each project. If you can follow a recipe, you can follow an Instructable.

2. Make

Make: is a quarterly print journal and a webzine. Each themed journal is stuffed with clever DIY projects for tinkerers of various skill levels. A recent edition, Make: volume 43, features wearable technology and includes projects such as DIY smart watches and bionic arms. Make: and the "maker" culture it champions via Maker Faires and support for locally run Maker Spaces lean toward gadgets and tech, but not exclusively. The website also includes a store, the Maker Shed, with books, journals and plenty of starter kits, perfect for beginning gizmo DIYers.

3. Apartment Therapy

"Saving the world, one room at a time" is Apartment Therapy's official slogan, but it could also be "high design for small budgets." The website features tips and advice for every room of an apartment or house, and lots of DIY projects for clever storage and sharp décor. The how-tos aren't quite as thorough as those found on Instructables, but the projects are a little more polished.

4. Ana White

Ana White features a giant collection of furniture project plans from DIY doyenne Ana White and members of the community. Projects are sorted by type, skill level, style and room. Ana's plans are typically detailed and well-illustrated. Contributor plans can be less refined in presentation, but still easy to follow. DIYers who make something following plans from the site are encouraged to share their results, too. They are often even more impressive than the originals.

5. The Family Handyman

The Family Handyman features simple projects and DIY home maintenance tips and advice. While the website offers plenty of how-tos and information, you'll need a subscription (digital or print) to unlock all of the magazine's instructions and resources.

6. Mother Earth News

From baking bread to solar rooftops, Mother Earth News has been covering the DIY scene in print and online for decades. The site and magazine feature lots of tips and advice about sustainable living, from growing and preserving food, to living off the grid. DIY projects range from sundials to solar food dehydrators.

7. Low-Tech Magazine

You won't find a plethora of easy to follow DIY plans at Low-Tech Magazine. You will find a lot of fascinating articles that show how things used to be done – and how those old ways might help you live a cleaner, cheaper, more sustainable life today. From reconsidering how to keep warm at home to how to lift heavy things, Low-Tech reminds us that the new ways aren't always the best ways. It's a point-of-view DIYers of every skill level can use to help them solve problems and create things with their own two hands.

8. Urban Homestead

Urban homesteaders Jules Dervaes and his family produce more than 6,000 pounds of organic produce annually on just one-tenth of an acre. Produce is just the beginning of the Dervaes' extreme DIY lifestyle. From making biodiesel to preserving food, the family shares advice and resources on their website urbanhomestead.org. Beginning homesteaders can get started with workshops, books and videos.

Where to Buy Supplies Online

Whatever your DIY aspirations, you'll probably need supplies – and lots of them. Here are two places to start:

  • Oriental Trading sells all sorts of kitschy things, including all the stuff you'll need to get started on small, crafty projects. Think glue, glitter and Washi tape.
  • Save On Crafts takes a more polished approach – fewer googly eyes, more bird cages – but the selection is broad and affordable

Agent Login | Agent CRM Login